The Tooth Fairy’s Visit: A Memorable Moment and Milestone for My Little Girl

“Did you see her, Mommy? “She came! The tooth fairy came!” my missing tooth little girl told me still not fully awake from her slumber. Yesterday, my four year old lost her first tooth, and though it was emotional for me, I wanted to make it memorable for her. We talked about the tooth fairy, and Quinn asked me many questions. “Will she take the tooth back to her castle? Will she come in my room? How big is she? Will she return my tooth so that we can save it?”

I remember losing my first tooth when I was about her age. Wow, have things changed with the tooth fairy since then! There’s so many ways to make it a memorable experience beyond getting a monetary gift.

I purchased Quinn the complete tooth fairy kit through Amazon that included a satin bag for the tooth, a special case to house all of her baby teeth as she loses them and a hanger for the door knob so that he tooth fairy knows to stop by her room.

Though the tooth fairy is very busy collecting teeth, I wanted to ensure that there was a record of her visiting Quinn. She was kindly took the time to carefully examine my daughter’s tooth and to wrote up a detailed receipt.

The tooth fairy even gave me heads up through an App called Tooth Fairy Camera so that I’d know when she was stopping by so that I could get a little video clip of her to share with Quinn, which she just loved! Despite still coming to grips with my daughter having a milestone that signifies leaving behind babyhood and being a sliver of a step closer to adulthood, this was a memorable experience for us both.

 

Check out the one minute trailer below about he ooh fairy’s visit. She makes a cameo appearance it the end.

All the best,

Tanya

From Loose Tooth to Missing Tooth: Mommy Needs a Little Fairy Dust to Deal with This New Milestone

Last Saturday, as my four year old talked, I caught a glimpse of something that didn’t look as it once did. “Open your mouth, honey,” I instructed my daughter. My facial expression said it all as Quinn asked, “What’s wrong with my mouth, Mommy?” Her little bottom tooth shifted, and there was a wider space between it and the tooth next to it. “I think you might have a loose tooth,” I told her. After washing my hands and then examining the tooth much closer, my suspicion was correct, and I was filled with angst.

Of course, Quinn losing her first tooth is imminent, but I just thought I had more time. It just so happened that she had a dental appointment this past Monday, and her dentist confirmed that she was about a year early with losing her first tooth. I then thought about when I lost my first tooth, and I was around her age as well, so the dentist said that losing teeth early can be hereditary.

I wondered how much time I had before her tooth would fall out and if it would fall out on its own or if I’d need to help it along. Could she possibly swallow it?  Then I started to think about what the loose tooth represents. One of the earliest signs of adulthood: an adult tooth coming in soon. Yikes! Quinn could sense that I was not totally happy about her losing her first tooth as asked why I was upset to which I responded, “You’re not my baby girl anymore.”

How is it that I was so excited when my little girl got her first two teeth at five months, but now I’m filled with anxiety? This major milestone makes me wonder. As she continues to mature, become her own person and learn about the world, am I doing all that I can to support her and leave a good imprint on her well into adulthood?

Today, while Quinn was having daddy and daughter time, I got a call with her on the other line, “Guess what, Mommy!” I lost my tooth! It came out a Red Robin!”  Even though  I am still struggling with this milestone a little ahead of schedule, I am happy that Quinn was excited. For her, the loose tooth represents being a big girl and getting a visit from the tooth fairy. For me, it represents many more emotional milestones to come. I just hope that I’m ready.

All the best,

Tanya

A Lesson from My Little Girl: Swimming in The Metaphorical “Deep End” of the Pool

“Did you see me, Mommy? Did you see me dip my head in the water?” my little girl excitedly inquired. “Yes, I did! I’m so proud of you, honey!” I exclaimed. My little girl went from panicking and crying when getting her hair washed about a half year ago to standing in a swimming pool without me by her side eager to learn and follow her teacher’s instructions.

Just about seven weeks ago, I enrolled my four year in swim lessons at Kids’ First Swim after she expressed an interest in to learning swim. I wasn’t sure how well she would do without me considering that she was very nervous when she was a little over a year taking lessons in the water with me. To my surprise, she did not cry and readily got into the water. She did inform me ahead of time, however, that she does not like getting water in her eyes and ears because of the “funny feeling” she gets, which is understandable.

Nevertheless, on level one, one of the skills was for Quinn to bob her head under water five times, so I knew this would be a major hurdle for her. In week one and two, she did everything but put her head under water; I could see the uncertainty in her eyes. Before going into the water during week three, she said, “Mommy, I know I have to put my head under water, and I’m trying really hard, but I’m just nervous.” I reassured her that it’s okay to be nervous and that the more she is in the water the more comfortable she will feel.

That day, I observed her through the one-way mirror as she slowly put her little chin in the water. After class, she asked if I saw her, and I smiled and told her I did, to which she responded, “You see, Mommy, it may take me some time, but I’m going to get there, you’ll see!” By the fifth class, she was making progress but still not quite getting her head under  water, so I sat her down and we talked about her possibly needing to take level one again.

I was impressed that she was not upset but  was just eager to try again so that she can continue to improve. I asked, “Are you enjoying learning how to swim?” Quinn smiled and said, “Yes.” I asked, “Are you having fun?” In an even louder and confident voice, Quinn said, “Yes, Mommy!” She then said, “As long as I try my best, that’s okay, right Mommy!?” I smiled and told her, “Absolutely!”

Last week, we started a new session on level one, and Quinn put her head all the way under the water for the first time and arose with this huge smile on her face demonstrating how proud she was of herself.

This is one of many experiences my daughter will have which will present a challenge, and I just love the way she’s handling it. I just hope I continue to handle it as well as she does with the many challenges  and hurdles that may take us both in the “deep end” of life.

All the best,

Tanya

My Little Girl’s Baby: Bring on the Dolls & Their Accessories!

My daughter excitedly put on her nightclothes and quickly rushed to the mirror. Hugging her little baby doll, she smiled at me, “Look, Mommy! We’re dressed exactly alike!” Up until a few weeks ago Quinn occasionally played with her dolls, but for the most part she and Grover have been inseparable. But ever since that moment of Quinn and her baby wearing the same nightclothes (a gift courtesy of her Nana), she’s become immersed in the idea of being a little mommy to her little baby.

She’s requested a little toothbrush so they can brush their teeth together, wants to know if we can find more outfits so that they can dress alike again and wants to bring her along in addition to Grover on car rides. With this in mind, she most recently asked, “Mommy, can we get my baby a car seat so that she’s safe just like me?” She also asked for a baby carrier too so they can walk around together. I guess I knew this day would come eventually. It’s cute watching her tend to her baby doll, but I have a feeling that once she finds out about the American Girl Dolls that this is going to be one costly next few years, but it’ll be fun and worth seeing that big smile on her face.

All the best,

Tanya

Let’s Start Reading: Loving the Library with My Preschooler

Last week, my four year old said, “You know where we haven’t been in a while, Mommy?” “Where?” I inquired. With a big smile, she responded, “The library!”It actually had been a couple of months since we’ve visited the library as a result of taking many summer day trips outside of her pre-school’s camp. Then with her hands clasped she pleaded, “Can we go there today? Please? Pretty please?” How on earth could I possibly deny that request? Of course, I said yes.

“I need to get books so that I can learn to read,” she informed me.” Wow, I thought to myself. I remember when Quinn was just learning to talk. She’s always loved books, and my husband and I have read to her since she was born. So it pleases me that she considered going to the library as a fun and special outing.

While all libraries are different, many offer so many wonderful resources to engage children of all ages in reading and learning in general. Our local library has many books from which to choose, Hoopla, the online resource for digital media, ABC Mouse (An online learning resource) for free and many free activities related to STEM and literacy.

I look forward to visiting the library with my daughter more and more frequently to take advantage of the resources while supporting her desire to learn to read. Though she definitely has some time to go before mastering reading and how to spell, it is my hope that she’ll enjoy reading to me just as much as I like reading to her and that her enthusiasm for learning will continue to increase.

All the best,

Tanya

A Swimmingly Fun Summer with My Little Girl

With a big smile on her face, my four year old said, “Look at me, Mommy! I’m swimming!” Actually, she was doing something I recall doing as a child: wading in the water and moving my arms back and forth to give the illusion that I was swimming. When Quinn was not quite a year and half, my husband and I signed her up for swim lessons and figured she’d do fine since she loved playing in her bath tub water. However, once in a much larger body of water, an olympic sized swimming pool at a nearby college, my poor baby would cling onto me for dear life. We thought that perhaps she could sense my nervousness, so my husband decided to go in with her. While she did much better and even seemed to be having fun on an occasion or two, one of the instructor’s methods was immersing the child fully in the water, just for a second or two in a playful way, but my little girl was having none of that. She looked absolutely terrified. After that, it was extremely difficult to get her in the water without clinging on to my next or my husband’s neck.

We figured that it was normal and that she’d eventually become relaxed and more comfortable in the water, as some of the other children, ranging from under a year up to age three, but after a couple of months she still seemed anxious yet was not able to verbalize how she was feeling. At that point, we thought it was best to not continue lessons and to revisit them once Quinn showed an interest and could tell us what she wanted.

In the months and few years that followed that experience, she does enjoy water play and being in the ocean holding my hand, and being in a large swimming pool is a totally different experience for her: certainly more fun! Based on how she’s been enjoying the water in an actually swimming pool this summer, I think she just might be ready for swim lessons again.

We even talked about it on a few occasions, and unlike when she was a year and a half and unable to tell me what frightened her or made her uneasy about swimming, at four years old, she had no problem telling me, “Mommy, I just doesn’t like it when water gets in her eyes.”  This is understandable because I don’t like that either, so we went shopping to pick out some Paw Patrol goggles. Not too far from “The Little Gym,” where Quinn takes classes, a new swim school geared towards children opened up, so I plan on looking into it to see if it’s a good fit for her. I’m hoping that my little girl will “really” be able to swim or at least feel more comfortable in a large swimming pool in the years and summers to come.

All the best,

Tanya