Coronavirus Lockdown: Yoga Together with My Daughter

It’s going on the fourth week since my six year old has been physically in her classroom since the Coronavirus lockdown, and I’ve been trying my best to give her sense of normalcy with a daily schedule that mimics what she would be doing in school. While I could have just focused on reading, writing and math, I decided that it is equally important to focus on the special subjects like, art, music, science and gym. So each day, we’ve been doing a fun activity. I decided to share my experience in hopes that it may give parents an idea to try with their child or children.

Last week, for gym, Quinn and I did yoga together. While I’m sure there may be some videos on YouTube geared towards children, I have a DVD on Yoga for kids, and it was perfect and challenged us both. “I can’t wait for the tree pose and the warrior pose,” Quinn said. As we looked at each other and smiled, sometimes teetering a little in the different poses, I thought to myself, what a wonderful bonding experience. After we finished the series of poses, she asked if we could do yoga again for “gym” because it’s relaxing and fun. “Of course,” I said.

Even though we’re both adjusting to the new norm, which will require more adjusting again when the college courses I teach resume all online tomorrow, I’m grateful for the extra time and activities we’re getting to do together.

All the best,

Tanya

 

 

This Mommy’s Treading Lightly: Carefully Addressing the Seriousness of the Coronavirus with My Little Girl

Getting some fresh air

This past week has been a roller coaster ride. My first grader‘s school has been closed since March 10th and might reopen on March 30th, fingers crossed. While dealing with the “new norm,” as a result of the Coronavirus, involving her schooling, my job and the many business closures in my area, I’m a bit conflicted with if I‘m providing my six year old with the necessary information, tools and support as we embark on uncharted territory.

I explained to her that some people are very ill, and her school wants to make sure she and her classmates are safe, so this is why there’s no school. Like any normal kid, she was initially happy about having time off, but she did say that she misses her friends and teacher.

Though I’ve been making an effort to practice “social distancing,” I haven’t really explained that to Quinn. The park is usually empty when we’ve gone to get some fresh air, but a few days ago, we did see one of her classmates who she immediately wanted to hug. I didn’t know how to address it or if I should have stopped her from hugging her friend.

I gave her a wipe as we were leaving the park, as I have been doing for years. When we got home, I just told her to wash her hands for snack, as we normally do when coming from the park.

Yesterday, Quinn asked to go to the park to film some of her video for her YouTube channel, Quinnie’s Fun House, about ten things to do when you’re bored. So before going to the park , I did explain to her that more people are getting ill and that we want to keep her healthy. I informed her that I’d be spraying the swing with disinfectant to get rid of germs and that she’d use a wipe as she always does upon leaving the park. Quinn was okay with this and even reminded me about the wipe and not wanting germs from other people.

While I’m glad she’s taking it all in stride, I am concerned about making her scared or leery of interacting with people for fear of becoming very ill. Also, I know how important interactions with children her age are for her, especially since she’s an only child. I’m trying my best to tread lightly and be a sensitive yet strong mom for her.

I wonder, how are other people coping with explaining all of what’s going on to their young children? Any advice!?

All the best,

Tanya

It Might Seem Like All Fun & Games, But Kids Are More “Clued” in Than We Think!

“It was Scarlet with the lead pipe in the garage,” my daughter asserted. We both love playing games. I especially enjoy how it not only gives us quality time together but improves not just her critical thinking but mine too.

Clue was one of my favorite games to play with my sister when I was younger. While I was eager to introduce it to Quinn, I was a bit apprehensive because of the premise of the game: find out who committed the murder, with what and where? According to the box, it’s for ages eight and up, but after giving it some thought and discussing it with my six year old, we determined that she could handle it without the game being too much for her. Boy, was I right!

Though there were newly added rooms, and I had to relearn some of the basic rules, it took Quinn no time to catch on to the concept of Clue. She strategically went to the different rooms to cross off what places the murder didn’t happen, and paid close attention as her dad and I did the same so that she could rule out suspects.

As I determined what cards were in the clue envelope and eagerly awaited my turn, Quinn solved the crime! I was always amazed at how “clued” in she was. A part of me was pleasantly surprised, but then again, she’s always been good at critical thinking. Some people think children are too young to understand certain concepts or lack basic critical thinking skills, but oftentimes it is us adults who are clueless for doubting or underestimating the abilities of children. Time and time again, Quinn reminds me of how adults can learn so many lessons from children.

All the best,

Tanya

“Lucky” Number 13! Hoping & Wishing My Six Year Old & I Will Still Be Close

“I’m not looking forward to you turning 13,” I told my six year old, as we sat at the dining room table. Quinn asked, “Why not?” To which I responded sadly, “Once you’re a teenager, you won’t want to hang out with me.” This discussion came about because her cousin just celebrated her 13th birthday, and it made me think about how time is just flying by. My little girl made my day and said, “Of course, I’ll still want to hang out with you, Mommy! Hanging out with you is one of my favorite things to do!”

As a smile came across my face, I thought for a moment and then asked, “How about we record a video of you saying that?” She eagerly obliged, but her refused to be a witness. I guess he knows that she’ll evolve in years to come and may or may not still feel the same way. My hope is that  our bond will be even stronger, and we’ll both get a chuckle from watching the video. If not, I’ll always have it to look back on bringing a smile to my face as I recall how enjoying each others company was one of our favorite things to do.

All the best,

 

Tanya

Having a Great Time Bonding at Quinnie’s Fun House!

A little over a month ago, I decided to fulfill my six year old’s request to help her start a YouTube page: Quinnie’s Fun House. While I was certain that it would be involved and a fun experience, I find myself wondering why I didn’t help her start this page when she asked a couple of years ago.

With 14 posts ranging from topics on dolls and accessories, kid spa sets, adventures on the go and Adventure Academy, we’ve bonded over ideas and discussed the importance of confidence. It also allows for many teachable moments where I remind my daughter that it’s okay to make mistakes, and it may take practice to get the video to be just how she wants it. I let her know that I’m so proud of her for simply trying her best.

Though we’re still in the early stages, we’ve found ways to incorporate the videos into her everyday activities without them becoming intrusive or feeling like work. Quinn even said, “Some things can be for Youtube, and others can be special just for us!” I love the way she thinks and let her take the lead.

It makes me feel so good to help her by filming and editing the videos and posted about them for family and friends on her page, quinniesfunhouse.com and mine because they’re not just for YouTube but for us. I’m already envisioning looking back on her videos when she’s ten or even sixteen with a smile on my face wondering where the time went.

All the best,

Tanya

Baking is Love, Especially When They’re Cookies From a Sweet Girl!

“I love baking with you, Mommy! Can we do it more often?” my six year old asked. “I don’t see why not,” I told her. I love baking, especially when I get to do it with my daughter. I get to guide her through the process. We get to talk, laugh and just be in each other’s presence. Also, I just feel the love. On Valentine’s Day, she was eager to bake cookies to give to people she loves and did it from start to finish. She even effortlessly used the cookie press after I demonstrated how to use it. I’m so grateful that displaying love is something that’s effortless for the both of us, not just on Valentine’s Day but everyday.

All the best,

Tanya

Celebrating School: My Daughter’s 100 Days Smarter!

“Guess what, Mommy! Mrs. Moore said that we’re all 100 days smarter,” my first grader told me upon getting home from celebrating the 100th day of school. I have a sharp memory, and I do not recall ever celebrating the 100th day of school, just maybe the last day when everyone was eager to start summer break. While some parents may think the projects and hoopla is overboard, as a professor and parent, I think it’s awesome!

There’s so many goals students must complete and achieve. For some, it may be a cinch, while for others it may be overwhelming or extremely difficult. Either way, showing up and trying one’s best must be acknowledged too. It helps keep up morale and motivation. It also allows both parents and teachers to reflect on how far their students have come without it necessarily being about a grade or milestone that must be achieved.

Within that 100 days, Quinn hasn’t only gotten smarter intellectually but socially and emotionally. She’s gotten a little taller, developed new interests and even decided that she might want to be a teacher as her profession instead of a dancer. Indeed, I do anticipate more changes to come in the next 100 days, but I’m glad we both had an opportunity to rejoice in the time that’s passed thus far: she with her teacher and friends, and me as her proud mother.

All the best,

Tanya