What Would We Do Without It Wednesday: Meet and Greets with Daddy

“How much longer do we have to wait until Daddy’s train comes, Mommy?” my daughter inquired. “Just about three minutes,” I respond. Then about a minute later she asked, “How many minutes now?” No matter how many times we walk, drive, use her scooter  or ride bikes to the train station to meet my husband as he gets home from work, the excitement and anticipation never dissipates for Quinn (Well, I’m excited to see him too). One time, she asked to wear her Paw Patrol watch so that she did not have to ask me how many more minutes it would take for his train to arrive, and of course this was the time that his train was running a few minutes behind schedule. “My watch says, 5:16, but Daddy’s train still is not here!” she informed me. “It must be running late, but he’ll be here soon,” I reassured her. Around 5:21, his train finally arrived, and a joyous smile came over Quinn’s face as she shouted, “There he is!”  My husband’s serious demeanor shifts to a playful one as he gives her a big hug and ask how her day was. Then I am relegated to push the scooter or bike all the way back home as she holds her dad’s hand or “helps” him roll his work bag up the street.

Even though I think about how wonderful of a bond Quinn and her dad have and how one of the ways it is displayed is through their train station meet and greet, with Father’s Day approaching, I decided to post an entry about how grateful I am to have a terrific husband who is loving and supportive of his daughter. I’m sure I speak for Quinn when I say, “I don’t know what we’d do without our meet and greets with her daddy at the train station.”

All the best,

Tanya

Happy Father’s Day: Can’t Forget About Daddy’s Baby Steps!

On Mother’s Day, my husband joked about how restaurants are booked to capacity, yet on Father’s Day you can just walk in the day of with no reservation and be seated immediately. While he said this lightheartedly, the reality is that there are many children without fathers or father figures in their lives. He is such a wonderful and caring father and very involved in our daughter’s life. He even works from home two days a week to be home with her.

As soon as Quinn woke up this morning, she asked, “Is today Father’s Day?” When I responded, “Yes it it.” She smiled and belted out, “Yipee! It’s Father’s Day! We get to give presents to daddy.” Though my blog focuses mainly on my journey as a mom to my now three year old little girl, I could not imagine this journey without my husband. He’s always been a great and giving person since I’ve known him, but watching his journey as a father and observing him develop a bond with our daughter has brought us even closer and makes me love him even more.

My hope is that he feels appreciated not just on father’s day but everyday.  I wholeheartedly appreciate all that he does for our little girl and our family. Here’s to all of the fantastic fathers out there: Happy Father’s Day!

All the best,

Tanya

Mommy’s “Monday” Moment: She’s Daddy’s Little Girl

Quinn and Her Daddy

Quinn and Her Daddy

From the first day my little girl was born most people, including my mother, have said, “She looks just like her daddy!” Every once in a while, someone will say that Quinn looks like a combination of the both of us. Either way, there’s no denying that she’s a “daddy’s girl.” I’m so happy that my soon-to-be three year old has such a close bond with her daddy. He even works from home two days a week to care for her on the days when I’m not working from home, which is wonderful. But the way in which she greets us is a clear indication that she is a “daddy’s girl.”

When I arrive home from work, she says, “Hi, Mommy,” gives me a quick hug and will then continue whatever she was doing. Every once in a while, she’ll display a heightened level of excitement to see me. For my husband, on the other hand, she will stop whatever she is doing and excitedly begin chanting, “Daddy, Daddy, Daddy! How was your day, Daddy!” Knowing that there are many children who do not have their fathers in their lives  and wish that they did makes me feel blessed knowing that Quinn has her dad in her life. I am also grateful that he plays such an integral role in her upbringing and has been a good role model. But if I am to be honest, I do occasionally have moments when I wish I had the same bond they have. Though we both can be “fun,” I tend to be the “enforcer” when Quinn is misbehaving or not listening. Is this just the way it is in most relationships where there is a mother and father or parents who automatically assume default roles such as the fun parent and disciplinarian? Some of my friends who have older children or even adult children say this does sometimes shift as children get older. These are just some thoughts I have from time to time. At the end of the day, I’m okay with Quinn being a daddy’s girl, and I am grateful for the bond we have as well, even if it is different than the one she has with her father.

All the best,

Tanya